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Fractures in the Education-Economy Relationship: Theoretical and Methodological Reflections Postgraduate Study Seminar Series

24 Jan 2019 (Thu) 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm

MBG06, G/F Patrick Lee Wan Keung Academic Building, Lingnan University

Speaker

Professor Hugh Lauder

Department of Education, International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM), University of Bath

Postgraduate Study Seminar 2019-1

 

Overview of the seminar

In this seminar, Prof Lauder will undertake a critical theoretical and empirical analysis of the traditional approach to analysing the education–economy relationship: skill bias technological change theory. He argues that while leading skill bias theorists have sought to address some of the anomalies that the theory confronts, there remain key data patterns that the theory cannot address.  Prof Lauder will discuss an alternative account that takes a broader political economy perspective and some methodological reflections on the process.

 

Date:

24 January 2019, Thursday

Time:

4:30 pm - 6:30pm

Venue:

MBG06, G/F Patrick Lee Wan Keung Academic Building, Lingnan University

Speaker:

Professor Hugh Lauder

Department of Education, International Centre for Higher Education Management (ICHEM),

University of Bath

Language:

English

On-line Registration:

Click Here

Enquiry:

Dr. Padmore AMOAH (pamoah@LN.edu.hk)

 

Biography of Speaker

Hugh Lauder is Professor of Education and Political Economy at the University of Bath (1996-to present) and Director, The Institute for Policy Research. He has studied at The University of London, (The Institute of Education), and gained his Doctorate at the University of Canterbury (NZ). He was formerly Dean of Education at Victoria University of Wellington. He specialises in the relationship of education to the economy and has for over 15 years worked on national skill strategies and more recently on the global skill strategies of multinational companies and their implications for graduate recruitment.